Final Blog Post

This semester in cognitive psychology we have learned a great deal of information that we can carry over into our careers and apply to everyday life. Chapter nine was all about language, how people learn language and how they understand it. This chapter was most useful in my opinion because when using interpersonal skills that we learned are apart of Howard Gardeners eight intelligences, from chapter 13, dictates our ability to communicate with others well. Understanding how to speak to people can create a path for you that leads to success or it can destroy that path. Under the topic of pragmatic there were five utterances that helped you decide on the best way to deliver you’re sentences so that they can be present it in a way that will best assist you. An expressive utterance can be said in many ways however, there is one way that is best ” I believe that this topic is most beneficial for this group in order to achieve the highest grade possible” this phrase is an expressive utterances that alleviates the speaker from total responsibility yet, motivates the group to trust in the statement. When you interacting with others its best to learn how to say something so that you’re point comes across clearly, you educe the appropriate emotion in you’re audience, and that you the speaker feel confident and safe with you’re statement. Interpersonal skills and the five utterances go hand in hand within today’s society because it is not always what you know but who you know through you’re everyday interactions. If you speak to others in a clear concise and meaningful way with statements that evoke confidence and honesty you will travel very far in life.

I believe that this cognitive psychology course has helped me learn how important psychology is not just to those who choose to make a career out of it but, to people who needed to know the best way to promote and project themselves to there colleagues, professionals, and peers.

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Intelligence

Our class discussion on intelligence was very interesting i believe that howard gardeners eight types of intelligence was definitely correct. There several forms of intellect that require a person to demonstrate understanding and be able to apply that understanding to a given task. I don’t not believe that a person is unintelligent if they cannot  perform multiple tasks from several areas of understanding like mathematics or interpersonal skills. However, i do believe that they to be of superior intellect you have to be well rounded in every form of intelligence and be able to apply it.

Oksapmin Counting

indielinguist:

Counting in Oksapmin
1 - tipun “thumb”2 - ləwatipun  “index finger”3 - bumlip “middle finger”4 - xətlip “ring finger”5 - xətxət ”little finger”6 - xadəp “wrist”7 - bes “forearm”8 - amun “elbow”9 - tuwət “upper arm” 10 - kat “shoulder”11 - gwel “side of neck”12 - nat “ear”13 - kin “eye”14 - lum “nose”15 - kin tən “other-side eye”16 - nat tən “other-side ear”17 - gwel tən “other-side side of neck”18 - kat tən “other-side shoulder”19 - tuwət tən “other-side upper arm”20 - amun tən “other-side elbow”21 - bes tən “other-side forearm”22 - xadəp tən “other-side wrist”23 - xətxət tən “other-side little finger”24 - xətlip tən “other-side ring finger”25 - bumlip tən “other-side middle finger”26 - ləwatipun tən “other-side index finger”27 - tipun tən “other-side thumb”
Oksapmin is a Highlands Papuan language spoken in Sandaun province of Papua New Guinea. Its counting system involves counting up 13 steps from thumb to nose, reaching 14 on the nose, then going back down the other side to reach 27 on the opposite-side thumb. On the completion of the cycle it is customary to raise both fists and exclaim tit fu! To say “then he didn’t come for eight nights,” for example, you say jəxə amunxe dik jox napingoplio, literally “then elbow’s time (he) didn’t come.” Although children today are still learning Oksapmin (along with Tok Pisin and English), the 27-base number system is falling out of use, with an English-style system being used for monetary transactions but older speakers still using the traditional system in contexts like counting string bags.Source: Evans, Nicholas. 2010. Dying words: Endangered languages and what they have to tell us, pp. 60-61. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Body-tallying counting systems for the win! But I’ve heard that there can be more diversity in a system than one might think, i.e. left ear is not necessarily 16 to all members of the community.
/h

indielinguist:

Counting in Oksapmin

1 – tipun “thumb”
2 – ləwatipun  “index finger”
3 – bumlip “middle finger”
4 – xətlip “ring finger”
5 – xətxət ”little finger”
6 – xadəp “wrist”
7 – bes “forearm”
8 – amun “elbow”
9 – tuwət “upper arm”
10 – kat “shoulder”
11 – gwel “side of neck”
12 – nat “ear”
13 – kin “eye”
14 – lum “nose”
15 – kin tən “other-side eye”
16 – nat tən “other-side ear”
17 – gwel tən “other-side side of neck”
18 – kat tən “other-side shoulder”
19 – tuwətən “other-side upper arm”
20 – amun tən “other-side elbow”
21 – bes tən “other-side forearm”
22 – xadəp tən “other-side wrist”
23 – xətxəttən “other-side little finger”
24 – xətlip tən “other-side ring finger”
25 – bumlip tən “other-side middle finger”
26 – ləwatipun tən “other-side index finger”
27 – tipun tən “other-side thumb”

Oksapmin is a Highlands Papuan language spoken in Sandaun province of Papua New Guinea. Its counting system involves counting up 13 steps from thumb to nose, reaching 14 on the nose, then going back down the other side to reach 27 on the opposite-side thumb. On the completion of the cycle it is customary to raise both fists and exclaim tit fu! To say “then he didn’t come for eight nights,” for example, you say jəxə amunxe dik jox napingoplio, literally “then elbow’s time (he) didn’t come.” Although children today are still learning Oksapmin (along with Tok Pisin and English), the 27-base number system is falling out of use, with an English-style system being used for monetary transactions but older speakers still using the traditional system in contexts like counting string bags.

I found the language that goes with the counting system of the Okaspmin people of Papua New Guinea i have no clue how to pronounce it so i found this additional video of a native speaking the words. 

Overconfidence Error

The overconfidence error is leads people to make bad decisions and stick to them even when they know that what they are doing is leading them down the wrong path. This short article talks about students and investors that have attributed they capabilities as far higher than what they can actually achieve. Students think they are above average while investor make terrible investments a lose loads of money. In order to break this cycle a person has to be honest in what they can achieve and asses themselves truthfully.

Analogical Reasoning

abstract-reasoning-test-practice

This a cool analogical reasoning test that is a little more difficult than the ones we observed in class. This is the type of reasoning test that would be on the LSAT. With a great deal of practice you can get very good at these types of test. I don’t think i would be too fantastic at this type of reasoning.

Cultural Differences

Cultural differences are what makes standardizing experiments very difficult. What is common and well understood in the US is foreign and confusing in other parts of the world. I found this video on hand gesture that would get you into trouble in other countries. This video is an example that words and gestures that are common in one part of the world mean something very different or even rude in another area. Acclimating oneself in what is appropriate in other cultures develops better interpersonal relationships.